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Full text of "The North-Carolina reader. prepared, with special reference to the wants and interests of North Carolina, under the auspices of the Superintendent of Common Schools"

THE 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER 



NUMBER I 




PREPARED, 

WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE WANTS AND 

INTERESTS OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMON '.SCHOOLS- 
BY REV. F. M. HUBBARD, 

PROFESSOR OF LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. IN THE UNIVERSQ • OF 
NORTH CAROLINA. 



FEW YORK: 

A. S. BARNES & Co, 111 & 113 WILLIAM STREET, 
AND E. J. HALE & SOT, 406 BROADWAY. 



I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/northcarolinareaOOhubb 



Worth Carolina State Library 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER 



NUMBEK I. 




PREPARED, 

WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE WANTS AND 

INTERESTS OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMON SCHOOLS 
BY REV. F. M. HUBBARD, 

PEOFESSOR OF LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE IN THE UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA. 



A. S. BARNES AND COMPANY, 
NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. 



n 

NORTH-CAROLINA SCHOOL-BOOKS 

Recommended by the State Superintendent. 



WEBSTER'S ELEMENTAEY SPELLING-BOOK. 

NORTH-CAROLINA READER No. I. 
NORTH-CAROLINA READER No, II. 
NORTH-CAROLINA READER No. III. 
DAVIES' PRIMARY ARITHMETIC, New Edition. 
DAYIES' INTELLECTUAL ARITHMETIC, New Edition, 
DAVIES' SCHOOL ARITHMETIC, New Edition. 
MONTEITIPS YOUTH'S MANUAL OF GEOGRAPHY. 
MITCHELL'S INTERMEDIATE GEOGRAPHY. 
BULLIONS' ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 



The following, belonging to the National Series of Standard School-Books, are 
commended to the attention of Teachers and friends of Education :— 



Willard's History of the United States. 

Willard's Universal History. 

Dwight's Grecian and Roman Mythology. 

Fulton & Eastman's Book-Keeping. 

Parker's Natural Philosophy. 

Day's Art of Rhetoric. 

Monteith's First Lessons in Geography. 

McN ally's Complete School Geography. 

Clark's New English Grammar. 



Davies' Course of Mathematics. 
Zachos' New American Speaker. 
Darby's Southern Botany. 
Parker's "Word-Builder. 
Brookfield's First BooV in Composition 
Northend's Dictation Exercises. 
Boyd's Editions of English Poets. 
Boyd's Karnes' Elements of Criticism. 
Mahan's Intellectual Philosophy. 



BOOKS FOR THE TEACHER'S LIBRARY. 



Page's Theory and Practice of Teaching. 
Northend's Teacher and Parent. 
Davies 1 Mathematical Dictionary. 



Mansfield on American Education. 
De Tocqueville's American Institutions 
Davies' Logic of Mathematics. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1855, 

By A. S. BARNES & CO. 

£a the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District 

of New-York. 



PREFACE 



The series of North-Carolina Readers, now com- 
pleted in three numbers, is expressly recommended by 
C. H. Wiley, the Superintendent of Common Schools 
for the State. The highest number (No. 3) was made 
by him before he was elected to his present office ; and 
it was then his intention to complete the series. 

Not wishing, however, while acting as the highest 
executive officer of the Schools, to be interested in the 
sale of school-books, Mr. W. sold his work, at the cost 
of the stereotype plates and books on hand, to the 
present publishers, on condition that they would em- 
ploy some citizen of the State to prepare two primary 
numbers ; and he suggested the undersigned as a suita- 
ble person to undertake the task. 

In compliance with this arrangement, and by the 
assistance of Mr. W., the series of North-Carolina 
Readers has been completed ; and as the Editor has 
felt diffident of his ability to make such books as would 
recommend themselves over all others of the kind, he 
deems it proper to allude to a few of the peculiar ad- 
vantages aimed at by the Superintendent of Common 
Schools while making efforts to have this work com- 
pleted. These are — • 

1. The encouragement of a feeling of self-depen 
dence, and the enlistment of popular sentiment in be- 
half of the State, and of its institutions. It was not 



4 PREFACE. 

thought important, however, to have more than one 
No. of the Readers of merely local interest. 

2. To remedy the evil, everywhere complained of, in 
Common Schools, of a perpetual change of text-hooks ; 
an expensive habit, and one which injures the schools 
by preventing the children from being classified. A 
series of home Readers, it was supposed, would be cer- 
tainly used, and this great evil thus avoided. 

3. Economy, the popular systems of Readers being 
too long, and being made so often merely to add to the 
profits of authors and publishers. 

This series is to consist of fewer numbers than those 
generally used ; and it is believed that these numbers 
are sufficient, while if the system were universally used 
in the State, the sum saved to parents and children 
would amount to several thousand dollars annually. 

4. To put in the hands of children learning to read, 
compositions sufficiently familiar, hut not of the char- 
acter called childish : compositions containing, in lessons 

4sy enough for all ages, correct specimens of style, 
interesting in matter, and inculcating proper moral and 
. oiigious instruction. How nearly this last object has 
been attained, it is not proper for the undersigned to 
undertake to decide : he can only say that his purpose 
has been such as indicated. 

Finally, the series is not over-burdened with rules, 
while there are enough to suggest to teachers the kind 
of instruction which, to he most effective, must neces- 
sarily come from them. 

F. M. H. 

Chapel-Hill, March 20th, 3*55. 



CONTENTS 



Lesson Pag8 

Elementary Pkinctples , . . 9 

1. Easy Lesson 13 

2. Easy Lesson 14 

3. Easy Lesson 14 

4. Easy Lesson 15 

5. Easy Lesson 16 

6. The Horse 17 

7. The Cow 17 

8. The Sheep 18 

9. John and his Dog 19 

10. Mary's Lamb 20 

11. Select Sentences 22 

12. The Dove 24 

13. The Lamb 25 

14. China 26 

1 5. Morning Prayer 28 

16. The Stars 29 

17. The Eagle 31 

18. The Wasp and the Bee 34 

19. Letter from Uncle John 36 

20. The Beaver 89 

21. Evening Prayer 41 

22. God the Creator of all Things 42 

23. The Orleans Plum 43 

24. Truth 44 

25. Uncle John— No. II 45 

26. The Trees of Ceylon 48 

27. The old Man and his Ass 50 

28. Birth of the Saviour 52 

29. Catching Bears 54 



6 CONTENTS. 

Lesson Paga 

30. Disobedience to Parents — a True Story 57 

81. Uncle John— No. Ill 60 

32. The honest Poor Man . . 65 

83. God is in Heaven 69 

34- Select Sentences 10 

35. The Vain Beauty 72 

36. Uncle John— No. IV 75 

37. Maker of Heaven and Earth 79 

38. The Carpenter Bee 81 

39. The Cruel Boy 83 

40. The Idle Children . 86 

41. Remember the Sabbath 39 

42. The Tailor Bird. ...... 90 

48. Uncle John— No. V 92 

44. Uncle John— No. VI 94 

45. I'm not too Young for God to Set 98 

46. The Farmer , , . , . , . . 99 

47. Little Children brought to Jesus . , . . 102 

48. The Pretty Bee 103 

49. Raising the Widow's Son c 104 

50. Easy Questions for Little Children 105 

51. Uncle John's Last Lecture 101 



SUGGESTION TO TEACHEKS. 



This work is compiled with the supposition that Teachers 
will do their duty, making it an object to assist their pupils m 
making progress in information, rather than to push them from 
one book to another. 

But few rules are given : but if the teacher will properly ex- 
plain and illustrate these, in all their bearings, and have them 
thoroughly understood, the scholar will need no additional ones. 

This series of Readers consists of but few numbers ; but when 
the student has learned to read well in all, and understands the 
contents of all \ he can select his other reading books for himself 



ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES, 

TO BE WELL STUDIED BY ALL. 



The English alphabet contains twenty-six letters ; 
they are— 

a, b, c 5 d, e, f. g, h, :, j, k, 1, m 5 n 5 o, p 5 q, r, s 5 t, u, 
v, w, x, y, z. 

Letters are divided into vowels and consonants. A 
vowel is a letter that can be soimded by itself. 

The vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y. 

All the letters except the vowels are consonants ; 
they are b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, 1, m 5 n, p, q, r, s, t, v, x, z, 
and sometimes w and y. 



VOWEL SOUNDS. 

A has four sounds — the long, the short, the broad, and 
the Italian : 

long, as in fate, make, 
short, as in fat, lad. 
broad, as in fall, b&U. 
Italian, as in far, arm. 



10 ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES. 

E lias three sounds — the long and the short, and 
sometimes that of a long : 

long, as in mete, fear, 
short, as in met, men. 
like a long, as in there, where. 

I has four sounds— the long, the short, that of short ii, 
and also that of long e : 

long, as in pine, fire. 

short, as in pin, miss. 

like ii short, as in bird, third. 

like e long, as in police, marine. 

O has four sounds — the long, the short, the long and 
close, and the broad, like broad a : 

long, as in note, sore. 

short, as in not, con. 

long and close, as in move, soon. 

broad, like broad a, as in nor, sort. 

U has three sounds — -long, short, and middle : 

long, as in tune, pure, 
short, as in tub, hiit. 
middle, as in full, push. 

Y has three sounds— the long, the short, and that 
of short ii : 

long, as in type, lyre. 

short, as in sylvan, symbol. 

like ii short, as in myrrh, myrtle. 



ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES. 11 



DIPHTHONGS. 



A diphthong is the union of two vowels in one sound, 
as ow, in cow ; oa, in boat. Diphthongs are of two 
kinds, proper and improper. 

A proper diphthong is one in which both the vowels 
are sounded, as in cow. 

An improper diphthong or digraph, is one in which 
only one of the vowels is sounded, as in head, boat. 

A triphthong is the union of three vowels in one 
sound, as eau, in beauty. 

CONSONANTS. 

B has one sound. 

C has two sounds, one like &, and one like soft s» 

D has one sound, 

F has one sound. 

G has two sounds, soft in ginger, hard in get. 

H has one sound, and is silent after r, as in rhyme, 

J has one sound. 

K has one sound. 

L has one sound. 

M has one sound. 

N has one sound. 

P has one sound, and is silent before n, as in 
pneumatics. 

Q has two sounds, one of Jew, the other of fa Q is 
always followed by u. 

R has one sound. 

S has two sounds, one like proper s, the other like z* 

T has one sound. 



12 ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES. 

V has one sound. 

W has one sound. 

X has three sounds— first, that of Jcs in wax ; second, 
of z in Xenqphon / third, of gz in exact. 

G and Jc before n are always silent. 

P before s is always mute. 

"W before r is mute. 

Ch has three sounds — first, that of tsh in church; 
second, of h in Christ / third, of sh in machine. 

Si before a vowel is sounded like sh, as in mission, or 
like zh, as in 03^, (pronounced mishun and ozher.) 

Zi before a vowel is sounded like sh in nation. 

Ph is sometimes sounded like y in philosophy, and 
sometimes like # in Stephen. 

Th has two sounds — the first sharp, as in thfoik; the 
second flat, as in that. 



# 



4 THE NORTH-CAROLINA HEADER 





NUMBER I. 






LESSON I. 




stops 


made 


thing 


work 


learn 


when 


hand 


stand 


well 


earth 


know 


learn 


wood 


marks 


heat 


erect 


fire 


gives 


well 


whenever 


just 


light 


fine 


remember 



Sit or stand erect, when you read. 

Be careful to learn and remember the stops and marks so 
well, that you will know their meaning whenever you meet 
them. 



Men saw wood for the fire. 
God made the earth and sea. 
We love just and wise men. 
The sun is up : it gives us light and heat* 
Who made the sun ? 

God made it ; and every thing we see is the 
work of his hand. 



14 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. L 





LESSON II. 






him 


you 


read 


would 


Wi- 


slow 


good 


speak 


leaps 


■.,- 


play 


deer 


world 


lamb 




skip 


fox 


turns 


fowls 




when 


sly 


round 


catch 




Read slow. 










Read as you 


would speak 


if talking to your 


friend. 





The world turns round in a day. 

A lamb will skip and play. 

The fox is sly, and will catch geese and other 
fowls. 

Good boys and girls will act well. 

The deer is a fine beast. 

The deer can run fast, and when he runs he 
takes long leaps. 



LESSON III. 



frost 

will 

grow 

that 

night 



read 

breath 

your 

draw 

never 



upon 

before 

paper 

linen 

reading 



begin 

clothes 

cotton 

darkness 

together 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



15 



Never run your words together. 

Draw in your breath before you begin ; and read ^o as not 
to get out of breath. 



The frost will kill the leaves on the trees. 

Paper is made of linen and cotton rags. 

The shadow of the earth makes the darkness 
of the night. 

All that live get life from God. 

God makes the wool grow upon the little 
lambs, that we may have clothes to keep us 
warm. 



like 
must 
play 
owl 

laws 



LESSON IV. 

read drink 



easy 
fast 
think 
what 



eyes 
turkey 
winter 
native 



lessons 

shady 

country 

teachers 

reading 



Do not read easy lessons too fast ; but always think of what 
you are reading* 



1 like to play in the shady grove. 
The owl has large eyes and can see in the 
dark. 

We must do what our teachers bid us. 



1 1) NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

He must not drink a dram. 
In winter w e have snow and ice. 
Good men obey the laws of God. 
The turkey is a native of this country. 



LESSON V. 

woiih hate better reading 

oath what avoid noises 

wrong many action careful 

ihroat careless thoughts unpleasant 

Do not hiss your words through your teeth ; and be careful 
wi to cough and make unpleasant noises in your throat while 
reading. Avoid a sinof-son<r tone. 



One good action is worth many good thoughts, 
but a good thought is better than a careless 
oath. 

How happy would men be if they would 
always love what is right, and hate what is 
wrong ! 



There is a time for play, and a time for work : 
a time to read and study, and a time for sleep. 

There is a time for every thing that I ought 
to do. The only thing we have no time for, is 
sin. I have no time to do wrong. 



North LanMiR* 5tate LtDrary 

iMORTH-CARCa J £N i i.';P;ADER NO. I. 



17 





LESSON VI. 




found 


horse 


very 


master 


kind 


plow 


abuse 


animal 


cart 


must 


almost 


carry 


back 


wicked 


gentle 


country 



The horse is a very large animal. 

He is gentle, and will draw the plow or cart 
and carry his master on his back. 

We must be kind to the horse. 

It is very wicked to abuse the horse or any 
other beast. 

The horse is found in almost every country. 



LESSON TIL 



feed 


grass 


snow 


called 


milk 


when 


stable 


covered 


warm 


that 


butter 


winter 


calf 


make 


ground 


summer 



The cow gives milk, and from milk we make 
butter and cheese. 

The cow feeds upon grass in summer. 



18 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 




In winter, when grass does not grow, and 
when the ground is covered with ice and snow, 
she ought to have a warm stable and plenty of 
hay to eat. 

The flesh of the cow is called beef. And the 
flesh of the calf is called veal. 



LESSON Till. 



| of 


takes 


pair 


winter 


off 


comes 


large 


called 


flesh 


spring 


wears 


weather 


wool 


when 


very 


prepares 



The sheep wears a very warm coat in the 
winter, but when spring comes, and the weather 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



19 




is warm, a man takes a large pair of shears and 
cuts her coat off. 

He then takes the coat of wool and prepares 
it for the loom 

And when the wool is made into cloth, it is 
then made into clothes for men to wear. 

The flesh of the sheep is called mutton, 



LESSON IX, 



glad 


them 




than 


hunting 


woods 


name 




that 


master 


very 


calls 




comes 


ginger 


runs 


more 




yard 


sometimes 


John has 


a dog 


that he calls 


Ginger, Is not 


that an odd 


name 


for a 


dog? 




Ginger is 


a good dog. 







20 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 




If the pigs come in the yard he will run and 
bark at them, and make them go out. 

And sometimes John goes a hunting, and theu 
Ginger leaps and runs, for he is very glad to get 
his master to go to the woods with him. 



LESSON X. 



rule 


lamb 


fleece 


waited 


love 


what 


school 


appear 


laid 


snow 


eager 


animal 


sure 


laugh 


gentle 


lingered 


went 


makes 


teacher 


patiently 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 21 




MARY S LAMB. 

Mary had a little lamb, 

Its fleece was white as snow ; 

And everywhere that Mary went, 
The lamb was sure to go. 

He went with her to school one day e 

That w^as against the rule : 
It made the children laugh and play* 

To see a lamb at school. 

So the teacher turned him out ; 

But still he lingered near, 
And waited patiently about, 

Till Mary did appear. 

And then he ran to her, and laid 

His head upon her arm ; 
As if he said : Pro. not afraid, 

You'll keep me from all harm ! 

u What makes the lamb love Mary so V f 

The eager children cry : 

2 



22 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

" Oh, Mary loves the lamb, you know/ 1 
The teacher did reply. 

" And you each gentle animal 
To you, for life, may bind, 

And make it follow at your call, 
If you are always kind." 



LESSON XL 

God made all things. 

All men ousrht to love God. 

Bad men do not love God. 

We ought to be very good ; for God sees every 
thing we do. 

We ought to read the Bible, which is the 
Word of God. 

The Bible tells us what we ought to do, and 
what we ought not to do. 



The sun gives light to the world ; and when 
the sun goes down it is night. The sun rises in 
the east, and goes down in the west. 

The moon and stars give light at night. 

Apples, and plums, and peaches grow on trees ; 
flowers grow in the garden ; and corn and wh* at 
grow in the fields. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



23 



God made the sun, and the moon, and the 
stars, and the trees, and the flowers, and every 
thing: he made me also, and everybody. 

God sees me when I rise from my bed, and 
when I go out to w^alk and play. When I lie 
down to sleep at night, he keeps me from harm. 

Though I do not see the wind, yet it blows 
round me on all sides : so God is with me on all 
sides, and yet I see him not. 

If God is with me, and knows all that I do, 
he must hear what I say. 

Oh, let me not, then, speak bad words ; for if I 
do, God will not love me. 

Little boys and girls should pray to God, 




24 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



LESSON XII. 



dove 


harm 


help 


God 


this 


nest 


must 


when 


kind 


love 


good 


died 


bird 


girl 


John 


meek 


and 


can 


Jane 


does 




See this dove. It is a meek and kind bird, 
and does no harm. 

When two or more are in one nest, they live 
in love. 

John and Jane, and each boy and girl, must 
try to be good and kind. 

The Son of God, who died to save us from 
sin, can help you to be mild and meek like the 
dove. 



God sees all men. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 25 



LESSON XIII. 



not 


him 


here 


can 


put 


did 


lamb 


see 


you 


sin 


does 


not 


mind 


God 


mind 


one 


had 


was 


the 


mule 


spot 


that 


who 


toad 




HERE IS A LAMB. 



Does it not put you in mind of the Lamb of 
God who did no sin, and had no spot in him ? 

Pray to him. to put the same mind in you that 
was in him. 



Who can see God? We cannot but God 

« 

sees us. 



26 



NORTH-CAKOLLNA READER NO. I. 



LESSON XIV. 



China 


counted 


understood 


savage 


orderly 


Englishman 


country 


Chinese 


questioned 


heathen 


glorious 


immediately 


people 


considered 


instructed 


counting 


Chinaman 


differently 




Picture of a Chinaman. 
ABOUT CHINA. 



China is a heathen country ; yet it is not a 
savage country, for the people are quiet, and 
orderly, and industrious. 

It would be hard for a child to imagine what 
a great multitude of people there is in China. 

There are too many people in China, for there 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 27 

is not food enough for them all; and many are 
half starved. 

The poor can get nothing but rice to eat, and 
water to drink ; except now and then they mix 
a little pork or salt fish with their rice. Any 
sort of meat is thought good ; even a hash of 
rats and snakes, or a pie of earth-worms. 

Cats' and dogs' flesh is considered as nice as 
! pork, and costs as much. 

An Englishman was once eating with & China- 
man, and he wished to know what sort of meat 
was on his plate. 

But he was not able to speak Chinese. 

How then could he ask ? He thought of a 
way. Looking first at his plate, and then at the 
Chinaman, he said, " Ba-a-a," meaning to ask, " Is 
this mutton V 

The Chinaman understood the question, and 
immediately replied, " Bow-wow/ 5 meaning to 
say, " It is puppy-dog." 

You will wish to know whether the English- 
man went on eating ; but I cannot tell you this. 
How thankful we ought to be for having so 
many more good things to eat than the poor 
people of China ! 

Man may not see you, but the eye of God is 
an you : he can see you, if you are hid, 



9.8 



NORTH CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



LESSON XT. 



now 


kept 


through 


voice 


and 


night 


that 


awake 


see 


lift 


son 


would 


light 


pray 


done 


accept 




MORNING PRAYER. 



Now I awake and see the light : 

'Tis God who kept me through the night. 

To him I lift my voice and pray, 

That he would keep me through the day ; 

If I should die before 'tis done, 

O God, accept me through thy Son. 



You must not sin : God sees you. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 29 



LESSON XVI. 




THE STARS. 

" O mother," said a little boy, as lie was stand- 
ing by a window, in the early part of an autumn 
evening, " do come and look, you can't think how 
beautiful it is !" 

" What is beautiful, Arthur ? ,? said his mother, 
in reply, as she looked up from a book which 
she was reading. 

" Why, the sky, mother. The stars are all 
out shining so brightly. It seems as if they were 
looking right down upon me. Do just put down 
your book one minute, and come and look at 
them." 

Mrs. Pearce was always ready to gratify any 
reasonable request of her son. She was pleased 



80 NORTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

to see his attention directed to any of the won- 
ders of God's creation, and she willingly laid 
aside her book, to admire with him the beauti- 
ful scene without. 

" I used to think," said Arthur, " that the stars 
w'ent away somewhere, to get light in the day 
time ; and George Sommers says, he thought God 
kindled them up every night." 

" And what do you think about it now ?" said 
his mother. 

" Why, father told me that they are shining 
in the sky all day long, but that we can't see 
them till evening comes, because the light which 
the sun gives is so much greater. I wish I could 
count the stars, mother." 

" There is only one who can do that, my son." 

"Yes, 1 know. It is God. Father read me 
something about it in the Bible. 4 He telleth 
the number of them, he calleth them all by their 
names.' How much the good God can do, mo- 
ther !" 

" Yes, my dear, there are no limits either to 
his knowledge or to his power; and he is as 
good and merciful as he is wise and powerful. 
I trust that my son will learn to love his heav- 
enly Father in the days of his childhood." 

Mrs. Pearce continued a short time at the 
window, conversing with Arthur upon the lov- 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



31 



mg kindness of that Being who created the 
world and all that is in it. She then went w T ith 
him to his own little room, and before he retired 
for the night, she prayed with him— that in early 
youth he might consecrate himself to the Saviour. 



LESSON XVII. 



what 


making 


difficult 


said 


bundle 


forced 


claws 


mountains 


yellow 


down 


eagle 


easiest 


built 


people 


creature 


ledge 


cried 


screamed 


could 


began 


reached 


where 


growing 


woman 


wrung 


bosom 


animals 


steal 


getting 

THE EAGLE. 


wonderful 



The eagle is a large, strong bird. On the 
tops of mountains it builds its nest. What nests 
they are ! flat like a floor, and very strong : the 
great sticks are often placed between two high 
rocks that hang over a deep place. 

The eagles often carry off the hares and rab- 
bits to their nests, and sometimes young lambs. 



32 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



It is said that once, while the people were 
making hay in the field, a great eagle saw a babe 
lying asleep on a bundle of hay, and darting 
clown from above, seized it with its great claws, 
and flew away. 

All the people, in alarm, hurried off towards 
the mountains, where they knew this eagle had 
built its nest, and there they could just see the 
two old birds on the ledge of the rock. 




Many of them cried and wrung their hands in 
sorrow for the dear babe, but who would try to 
save it? 

There was a sailor, who was used to climb the 
tall masts of a ship, and he began to climb the 
steep sides of the mountain; but he had only 
gone a few steps, when the mother started up 
from the rough stone where she had been sit- 
ting, looking up at the eagle's nest ; and began 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 33 

to mount the rock herself. Though only a pool 
weak woman, she soon got before the sailor, and 
sprang from rock to rock, and when she could 
find no place for her feet, she held fast by the 
roots and plants growing on the mountain. It 
was wonderful to see how she had made her 
way! Her love to her babe strengthened he) 
limbs, and God kept her feet from slipping. 
Every one looked eagerly at her as she reached 
the top; they feared lest the fierce birds should 
hurt her ; but no, when she came near their nest, 
they screamed, and flew away. 

There the mother found her babe lying among 
the bones of animals, and stained with their 
blood ; but the eagles had not begun to eat it, 
nor had they hurt a hair of its head, The 
mother bound it with her shawl ti^ht round her 
waist, and then began quickly to descend, and 
this was far more difficult than it had been to 
get up. But where was the sailor all this while? 
He had only got up a little way, and then his 
head became giddy, and he had been forced to 
return. 

See the fond mother with her babe in her 
bosom, sliding down the rock, holding now by 
the yellow broom, and now by the prickly brier, 
and getting safely down places as steep as the 
sides of a house ! 



34 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

When she had got half way down, she saw a 
goat leading its two young ones into the valley ; 
she knew it would take its little ones alon^ the 
easiest path, and she followed the creature, till 
she met her friends coming up the mountain to 
meet her. How glad they were to see her again 
amongst them ! How- much they wondered to 
find the eagle's claws had not torn the tender 
flesh of the babe ! What w T ill not a mother do 
to save her child? 

I hope this little babe, when it grew older, 
loved the kind mother who had climbed up the 
steep rock, to save it from the eagle's cruel claws 
and bloody beak. 



LESSON XYIIL 



THE WASP AND THE BEE. 



A wasp met a bee, and said to him, "Pray, 
can you tell me what is the reason that men are 
so ill-natured to me, while they are so very fond 
of you? We are both very much alike, only 
that the broad golden rings about my body make 
me much handsomer than you are. We are both 
winged insects, we both love honey, and we both 
sting people, when we are angry. Yet men al- 



JSOKTH-CAROLINA READER ICO. I. 



85 



ways hate me, and try to kill me, though I am 
much more familiar with them than you are, and 
pay them visits in their houses, and at their tea- 
table, and at all their meals : while you are very 
shy, and hardly ever come near them : yet they 
build you curious houses, and take care of and 
feed you, in the winter, very often. I wonder 
what is the reason." 




The bee said, " Because you never do them 
any good, but, on the contrary, are very trouble- 
some and mischievous. Therefore they do not 
like to see you ; but they know that I am busy 
all day long in making them honey. You had 
better pay them fewer visits, and try to be 
useful. 7 ' 



36 NORTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

LESSON XIX. 

LETTER FROM UNCLE JOHN. 

It was a very bright clay in June, when little 
Henry and his sister Mary were walking with 
their Uncle John in their mother's garden. It 
was a very pretty garden ; but the mother had 
left this garden and her little children whom she 
loved very much: she had died, for all people 
have to die. They cried a great deal, and they 
were very fond of playing in the garden where 
their mother had planted so many beautiful 
things, which reminded them of her. 

One day, when Uncle John was with them, 
they got to talking about their mother, and how 
people were made, and why they died, and asked 
their uncle a great many questions about every 
thing. 

" You promised us once before, Uncle John/ 
said Henry, u to tell us how the flowers and trees 
were made, and who made them. 1 ' 

" Yes," said Mary, u and you said you would 
tell us all about the world, and who made it, 
and every thing. Mother told us that God made 
all things." 

" And so he did," replied Uncle John ; " he 
made the world, and all the people, and trees 



NORTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 37 

and flowers, and fish, and birds, and the clouds, 
and sun, and moon, and stars. He made this 
world, and all that is in it, in six days ;■ and when 
he made it, every thing was very good and beau- 
tiful. 

u God is good, and he hates every thing that 
is evil. He made every thing to be happy ; and 
when he made Adam and Eve, who were the 
first people, and the father and mother of ail 
the people in the world, he placed them in a 
garden, called Eden, where every thing about 
them was very delightful, and there was noth- 
ing to hurt or make them afraid. 

" The garden was a thousand times more 
beautiful than this ; and Adam and Eve lived 
in it, and every thing grew^ without the aid of 
labor ; nor did they need any house, the garden 
was so pleasant." 

" When did Adam and Eve live there V asked 
Mary. 

44 They were made a long time ago," said Uncle 
John : " Adam, and Eve his wife, had no father 
or mother, for God made them out of the dust 
of the earth ; and thus God is the father of all 
people. All the world, and every thing in it, 
were made for Adam and Eve; and they were 
made to have power over the other animals, and 
to be perfectly happy. There was no sickness 



38 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

then— no cold or heat — no pain — no quarrelling 
or fighting ; while all the wild animals were as 
gentle as your pet lamb, and there was nothing 
to do harm." 

" And why can't we live that way now?" asked 
Henry : " what makes folks quarrel and fight so, 
and kill one another in war?" 

" It is because of sin : you recollect I told you 
the other day what sin is. Do you remember, 
Henry, what it is ?" 

" It is disobedience to God." 

" But what is that ?" asked Mary. 

" To disobey God, is not to do what he tells 
us. There is a book called the Bible — the book 
your mother so often read to you. This is the 
Bible : it is the "Word of God, and tells all 
about him, and what he commands us to do, and 
what we ought to keep away from. When you 
learn to read better, I will get each of you a 
Bible, and you must both read it and study it, 
for it is the greatest and best book in all the 
world. But little children must play as well as 
learn ; and now you may run in the garden, while 
your Uncle John takes a walk to see how th© 
corn and wheat are growing." 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 39 



LESSON XX. 



car-ried 


car-pen-ter 


to~geth-er 


in-sects 


ob-tained 


prop-er-ly 


an-i-mals 


ex-act-ly 


ma-te-ri-al 


ma-sons 


sev-er-al 


se-ri-ous 


trow-el 


pos-si-bly 


cab-i-net 


cad-dis 


hab-i-ta-tions 

THE BEAVER. 


coni-ple-ted 



" There are many other trades carried on by 
insects, birds, and other animals, besides those 
of a tailor and carpenter ; but I have not time 
to enter upon them all. One word or two, how- 
ever, I must speak on the trade of a mason. 

" When I speak of insects being masons, I do 
not mean that they make mortar, handle a 
trowel, and build with stone obtained from the 
quarry, exactly as men do ; but that they build 
houses, as neat and as suitable for themselves to 
dwell in, as a mason could possibly build. 

"Several kinds of worms build themselves 
habitations in the water; and one sort, called 
the caddis-worm, builds his house of small stones, 
which he sticks together with a cement, which 
is as durable as mortar. 



40 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

" There is a bee, called a mason-bee, that builds 
his house of small stones and mortar : he makes 
the mortar with grains of sand, and a sort of 
glue or gum from his own mouth. 

" The beaver, however, being a larger creature, 
can be better observed when he is at work build- 
ing his house, than insects can. 




" This animal mixes together sticks, mud, and' 
stones, and then carries a lump of the mixture 
to the place where he means to erect his house. 
He then begins to build. After placing part oi 
his materials properly, he turns round and gives 
it a pat with his tail ; his tail being broad and 
flat, makes a very good trowel : thus he goes on, 
adding fresh material, and patting it with, his 
tail, till his house is completed. 

" But I think that, for the present, I have talked 
enough of these things, having told you of a fly- 
ing tailor, a hopping carpenter, and a mason that 
runs on four legs. 

" And now, my dear children, if you can learn 
nothing else from what I have said, try to re- 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 4i 

member this serious remark : that, whatever our 
dress now may be, we shall shortly wear a 
shroud ; that the cabinet-maker ere long will be 
called on to make us a coffin ; and that, however 
durable the houses may be which we now live 
in, they will at last crumble to dust : therefore 
we shall do well to look out for a home in the 
skies; 'a building of God, a house not made 
with hands, eternal in the heavens.' " 



A bad way has a bad end. 



LESSON XXI 



ere 


great 


sleep 


ma-ny 


bed 


words 


that 


grate-ful 


lay 


dear 


part 


pre-serve 


limbs 


still 


gen-tle 


par-ents 


here 


last 


strength 


e-ter-nal 




EVENING 


PRAYER. 





Ere on my bed my limbs I lay, 

Oh hear, great God, the words I say: 

Preserve, I pray, my parents dear, 

In health and strength for many a year. 



4:2 >T0RTH-CAR0LINA READER NO. I. 

And still, O Lord, to me impart 
A gentle and a grateful heart ; 
That after my last sleep, I may 
Awake to the eternal day. Amen. 



The Son of God can put our sins far off. 



LESSON XXII. 



sea 


light 


bless 


re-pent 


sky 


moon 


field 


de-stroy 


six 


stars 


fowl 


wick-ed 


made 


night 


beasts 


morn-ing 



God made the earth, and the sea, and the sky, 
and all things in them, in six days ; and all that 
was made was very good. 

He made man and the beasts of the field, the 
fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea. 

God will bless those who do his will. 

When you rise in the morning, and when you 
go to bed at night, give him thanks. 

God will destroy the wicked, but he will for- 
give those who repent and forsake sin. 



Eat such things as are set before you, 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 43 



LESSON XXIII. 

plum greed-y Or-leans sniart-mg 

some chil-dren dis-cov-ered greed-i-ly 

fault ap-ples con-tain ed grand-fa-ther 

mine peo-ple de-voured swelled 

rogue dress-ed ill-tem-pered ad-van-tage 

were grand-son quar-rel-ling of-fered 

THE ORLEANS PLUM. 

Yesterday I saw some greedy and ill-tempered 
children, who were quarrelling about some apples 
which had been given them. 

I hope that none of you are greedy and ill- 
natured, for that is a sad fault in young people. 

" Give me a bite of your plum, you rosy-faced 
little rogue," said I to a grandson of mine, who, 
dressed in his new jacket and trowsers, was about 
to set his teeth in a large Orleans plum, which 
had just been given him from the tree. With 
all the good nature in the world, he ran to me, 
and offered me the plum, when I found that it 
contained a wasp. 

Now, had he greedily eaten the fruit, instead 
of bringing it to his grandfather, he would no 
doubt have been stung by the &ngry insect, and 



44 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

perhaps been laid up for whole days with a 
swelled throat, or smarting tongue. 

Be good natured one to another, and you 
will avoid many a sorrow as sharp as the sting 
of a wasp; and secure many an advantage, as 
sweet and as pleasant as an Orleans plum. 



You should not lie, for God both hears and 
sees you. 



LESSON XXIV. 



truth 


youth 


speak 


love-ly 


fear 


walk 


truth 


be-times 


thing 


lie 


trust 


wis-doni 



Oh, 'tis a lovely thing for youth, 
To walk betimes in wisdom's way; 
To fear a lie, to speak the truth, 
That we may trust to all they say. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 45 



LESSON XXV. 

UNCLE JOHN NO. II. 

44 Uncle John, what clo you think Henry said 
when you left us in the garden to play ?" said 
Mary. " I told him it was a sin, and he said it 
w r as not, and we thought we would ask you about 
it as soon as you came in." 

44 And what was it, Henry?" kindly inquired 
Uncle John : 44 do not be afraid to tell me, for 
even if you have done wrong, it is better to tell 
it, for we cannot conceal it from God, even if 
we try." 

44 Will God forgive me for it," asked Henry, 
looking down, 44 if I did wrong? I did not wish 
to sin, sir." 

44 God will forgive ail who ask him, confessing 
their sins and being sorry for them, and wishing 
to do right." 

44 1 thought, sir," replied Henry, looking up, 
44 that if the Garden of Eden were such a beauti- 
ful and happy place, I would like to go there; 
and I told sister that when we were grown up 
we would go there and stay." 

44 My dear child," said Uncle John, " there is 
no such place now in the world." 

3 



46 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

" And wliat became of it then V 1 eagerly in 
quired Mary. 

" When God placed our first parents there/' 
said Uncle John, " he wanted them to be happy, 
and told them how they could be, for he was 
very good to them. But the devil, who is the 
enemy of God, and of every thing that is good — - 
and whom God will some day confine in a lake 
of fire forever—took on himself the form of 
a snake, and came to Eve, and talked to her, and 
deceived her, and made her believe it was not 
necessary to obey God in every thing. 

" God had told Adam and Eve that there was 
one tree in the garden, the fruit of which they 
should not eat ; and that if they did, they should 
surely die. 

" Now the devil persuaded Eve that it was 
no harm to eat this fruit ; and she ate of it, and 
persuaded Adam to eat also. Then they knew 
they had done wrong— they knew they had 
sinned against their heavenly Father who made 
them, and they were afraid, and hid themselves. 

" But we cannot hide from God, for he sees 
every thing and knows all our thoughts ; and he 
found Adam and Eve, and told them they had 
brought trouble, and sorrow, and death on them- 
selves, and all that were to come after them. 

" God never changes : he had told Adam and 



YOUTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 47 

Eve that if they ate the forbidden fruit they 
should die ; but he was merciful to them, and 
spared them for a while, that they might repent 
of their sins, and be saved when they did die. 
But he sent them out of Eden ; and no man 
was ever allowed again to find that happy place 
in this world. 

" From that time all people were born sin- 
ners : we all come into the world in sin, and 
we all have to work for our living, and to suffer 
diseases and pains, and in a few years to die. 
There was a dreadful change in every thing; but 
in our next talk I will tell you more about this 
wonderful history. 

" And now, Mary, you must kiss Willie, and re- 
member not to tell tales on him ; and you, Hen- 
ry, remember your sister did not wish to hurt 
yon by telling what you said. It was not wrong 
in you to wish to get to a happier place than this 
world, and to take your sister with you; it is 
kind and right in you both to try to do good to 
each other, and to make each other happy. God 
commands you to do it." 



48 



ST0RTH-CAK0LTTSL4 READER NO. I. 



LESSON XXVI. 



scent 


ver-y 


great 


groves 


smell 


large 


cu-ri-ous 


build 


e-nor-nious 


huge 


tree 


leaves 



THE TREES OF CEYLON. 



Ceylon is an island in the sea, far off. The 
chief beauty of Ceylon is its trees. 

I will mention a few of the beautiful, curious, 
and useful trees of this delightful island. The 
tree for which Ceylon is celebrated, is the cinna- 
mon-tree. 

For sixty miles along the shore, there are cin 
namon groves, and the sweet scent may be per- 
ceived far off upon the seas. If you were to see 
a cinnamon-tree, you might mistake it for a laurel, 
a tree so often found in our own woods. 

The cinnamon-trees are never allowed to grow 
tall, because it is only the upper branches which 
are much prized for their bark. The little chil- 
dren of Ceylon may often be seen sitting in the 
shade, peeling off the bark with their knives ; 
and this bark is afterwards sent to other coun- 
tries to flavor puddings, and to mix with 
medicine. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 49 

There are also groves of coeoanut-trees on the 
shores of Ceylon. A few of these trees are a 
little fortune to a poor man ; for he can eat the 
fruit, build his house with the wood, roof it with 
the leaves, make cups of the shells, and use the 
oil of the kernel instead of candles. 

The jack-tree bears a larger fruit than any other 
in the world,— as large as a horse's head — and 
so heavy that a woman can only carry one upon 
her head to market. This large fruit does not 
hang on the tree by a stalk, but grows out of the 
trunk, or the great branches. This is well ar- 
ranged, for so large a fruit would be too heavy 
for a stalk, and might fall off, and hurt the heads 
of those sitting beneath its shade. 

The outside of the fruit is like a horse-chest- 
nut, green and prickly; the inside is yellow, and 
is full of kernels, like beans. 

The wood is like mahogany— hard and hand- 
some. 

But there is a tree in Ceylon, still more curious 
than the jack-tree. 

It is the talpot-tree. This is a very tall tree, 
and its top is covered by a bunch of round leaves, 
each leaf so large, that it would do for a carpet 
for a common-sized room ; and one single leaf, 
cut in three-cornered pieces, will make a tent ! 
When cut up, the leaves are used for fans and books 



50 NORTH-CAKOLINA KEADER NO. I. 

But this tree bears no fruit till just be 
fore it dies — that is, till it is fifty years old : 
then an enormous bud is seen, rearing its huge 
head in the midst of the crown of leaves ; the 
bud bursts with a loud noise, and a yellow flower 
appears — -a flower so large, that it would fill a 
room ! The flower turns into fruit. That same 
year the tree dies ! 



You may die to-day : oh, how bad to die in 
sin! 



LESSON XXVII. 

THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 

An old man and a little boy were driving an 
ass to the next market to sell. 

44 What a fool is this fellow, 5 ' says a man upon 
the road, " to be trudging it on foot with his son, 
that his ass may go light !" 

The old man, hearing this, set his boy upon 
the ass, and went whistling by the side of him. 

44 Why, sirrah !" cried a second man to the 
boy, " is it fit for you to be riding, while your 
poor old father is walking on foot ?" 



NORTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 51 

The father, upon this rebuke, took down his 
boy from the ass, and mounted himself. 

"Do you see," says a third, "how the lazy old 
knave rides along upon his beast, while his poor 
little boy is almost crippled with walking V 

The old man no sooner heard this, than he took 
up his son behind him. 

"Pray, honest friend," says a fourth, "is that 
ass your own ?" 

" Yes," says the man. 

" One would not have thought so," replied the 
other, " by your loading him so unmercifully. You 
and your son are better able to carry the poor 
beast, than he you." 

"Anything to please," says the owner: and 
alighting with his son, they tied the legs of the 
ass together, and, by the help of a pole, en- 
deavored to carry him upon their shoulders over 
the bridge that led to the town. 

This was so entertaining a sight, that the peo- 
ple ran in crowds to laugh at it ; till the ass, 
conceiving a dislike to the over-politeness of his 
master, burst asunder the cords that tied him, 
slipt from the pole, and tumbled into the river. 
The poor old man made the best of his way 
home, ashamed and vexed, that by endeavoring 
to please everybody, he had pleased nobody, 
and lost his ass into the bargain. 



62 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



LESSON XXVIII. 



might 


sheep 


al-so 


glo-ry 


know 


shone 


be-fore 


a-fraid 


feel 


whole 


wor-ship 


ti-dings 


room. 


sang 


ver-y 


an-gel 


there- 


earth 


o-bey 


Da-vid 




BIRTH OF THE SAVIOUE 



Jesus Christ was once a child like you. He 
became a child that he might know how to 
pity and feel for a child, and that he might show 
little children how they ought to act. 

He lay with his mother Mary in a manger by 
the side of the cattle, for there was no room for 
them at the inn. 



NORTH- CAROLINA HEADER NO. I. 53 

He was a poor child, and yet he was the Son 
of God. 

And God sent a holy angel to tell some good 
men that took care of sheep in the fields, that 
the Son of God was born on earth. 

It was night, but the glory of the Lord shone 
about them, and made it light like clay. 

They were afraid, but the angel said, u Fear 
not; I bring you glad tidings of great joy; a 
child is born in the city of David, who shall save 
men from their sins." 

Oh, what good news was this to all who re- 
pent of sin, and fear the anger of God ! 

Then the angel began to sing praise to God, 
and many more, yea, a whole multitude came 
from heaven to join him, and all sang together, 
Glory to God on high, peace on earth, good-will 
to men. 

What a sweet and joyful song ! Was ever 
music heard on earth like this ? Do you hope 
one day to sing the praise of God w T ith angels 
and holy men in heaven? then you must for- 
sake sin, love God, and obey his law. 

The men who heard this song of the angels 
left their flocks in the field, and went to the man- 
ger to see the young child and worship him. 
Wise men also came from a for country to 
see him : and God made a very bright star 



54 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

to go before them, and lead them to the right 
place. 

Lo, the star which they saw came and stood 
over where the young child was, and the wise 
men were very joyful; and when they came 
into the house, they bowed down before the 
child, and called him their Lord and Saviour. 

When the shepherds and wise men went 
away, they told the good news to all they met, 
saying, Jesus is born to save us. 

And the child grew, and was wise and good 
in all his words and deeds. 

In all things he did the will of God who sent 
him, and he had the love of both God and man. 

If you wish to be like Jesus, listen while he 
says to you, " Come, and learn of me, for I am 
meek and lowly in heart, and you shall find 
peace to your soul." 

Seek ye out of the book of the Lord, and read 



LESSON XXIX. 



CATCHING BEARS. 



The most common method is to lay in their 
way a pot of honey mixed with brandy, of which 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 55 

the bear is so fond that lie would suffer himself 
to be killed rather than leave it. This beverage 
intoxicates him, and he may then be taken with 
ease. In North America the hunter looks for 
them in hollow trees, to which they retire with 
their young. He sets fire to the tree, and when 
they run out to escape, he fires at and kills 
them. 




The natives of Lapland, wdio still make use of 
bows and arrows, catch bears in another manner. 
When their dogs have discovered the retreat of 
a bear, he lays down his bow at the entrance, 
when the animal dares not leave it, but remains 
quietly in his den. Meanwhile the Laplander 
collects all the branches of trees and pieces of 
wood that he can find, takes his bow softly away, 
and gradually closes up the entrance of the den 
in such a manner, as to leave only a hole for the 
bear to put his head through. After this he 
teases and torments him. till the enraged animal 
rises and thrusts out his head in quest of his 
enemy. This is just what the hunter wants; for 



56 NORTH-CAROLINA HEADER NO. I. 

he instantly knocks him on the head with a 
hatchet, which he keeps in readiness for the 
purpose. 

In Poland they have a method of taking the 
bear, which differs from all these. The bees, 
which are very common in that country, deposit 
their honey in hollow trees, and the bears, who 
are exceedingly fond of it, climb up those about 
which they see the bees flying. This fondness of 
the bear for honey has given rise to a singular 
contrivance to cure him of it, In a tree in which 
is a hive, and just over the hive, is suspended a 
heavy hammer. 

The bear, allured by the honey, climbs the 
tree, and tries to push the hammer aside with 
his head ; but the instrument is placed in such a 
manner, that when it is removed, as the animal 
imagines, it falls back upon his head, and still re- 
mains over the hive. This irritates the bear; 
he pushes away the hammer with still greater 
force, and immediately it swings back on his head 
still harder. 

He again strives to get rid of the hammer, 
but the force of the strokes increases with his 
efforts, till at length he drops to the ground, 
when he is pierced with sharp stakes previously 
driven underneath the tree. Here he is caught 
and dispatched, if not already quite dead. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



57 



LESSON XXX. 



John 


Rob-ert 


e-nough 


home 


Hen-ry 


ac-ci-dent 


were 


John-son 


our-selves 


fa-ther 


a-lone 


at-ten-tion 


said 


dan-ger 


cir-cum-staur»p 


would 


morn-ing 


there-fore 


should 


ob-jec-tion • 


hap-pened 


night 


Thom-as 


dis-o-be-di-ence 


DISOBEDIENCE TO PARENTS- 


-A TRUE STORY. 



Robert, and Henry, and John, were at home 
for the summer holidays. 

"Father," said Robert, one fine morning, "may 
we not take the boat and sail down the river till 
dinner-time ?" 

" By no means," said Mr. Johnson : " I could 
not trust you alone, for fear of some accident. I 
am pretty sure you would not sit still, and then 
your danger would be very great." 

" Oh yes we will," said Henry, " if you will 
but let us go : we will be sure to be quiet, and 
take care ; and there is scarcely any wind this 



morning.' 



"I have no objection to your having a sail," 

3* 



58 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

replied Mr. Johnson ; " but you must not go by 
yourselves. I forbid your doing so. I will 
speak to Thomas, the gardener ; he knows well 
how to manage the boat, and shall go with you 
in about an hour," He then left home for the 
day. 

As soon as he was gone, Robert said, " I am 
sure I would not wait : the gardener may not be 
ready all day. I am old enough to manage 
the boat : I have often been out with my 
father." 

" Yes," said John ; " but father forbade our 
going alone ; and so we must not go." 

" But how will he know it ?" said Robert ; "he 
has gone out, and won't be home till five o'clock. 
We shall be home long before that time ; and if 
Thomas does not tell him, how will he know ? 
And I can speak to him to say nothing about our 
having gone by ourselves." 

They therefore determined to go. 

The boat w^ent on very well for some time, as 
the breeze was but a gentle one. 

Then Robert said, " I am glad we have not 
got the gardener with us: he would have spoiled 
all our sport, and we can do better without than 
with him : as if we could not manage a boat, 
indeed !" 

But now the breeze became a brisk gale ; and 



NOKTH-CAKOLINA HEADER NO. I. 59 

the boat had scarcely enough ballast for the large- 
ness of the canvas. 

The boys did not pay any attention* to this 
circumstance, as they were busy at play ; in an 
instant, therefore, when they all ran to one side 
of the boat, it upset, and threw them into the 
river. 

Happily, the gardener missing them, and fear- 
ing some accident, hastened down by the side of 
the river. 




He had just come up to them as the misfor- 
tune happened; and by great efforts he saved 
Henry and John from a watery grave* But 
disobedient Robert sank, and could not be 
found. 

The current bore him down so far, that his 



60 NORTH-CAROLINA READER, NO. I. 

body was not seen till several days afterwards, 
when it was brought to his distressed father by 
a fisherman. 

Dear children, remember how Robert was 
drowned, because he would not do as his father 
bade him ; and do not forget that no good ever 
did, or ever can, come from disobedience to 
parents. 



Breeze — a gentle, or low wind. 
Gale — a hard, or high wind. 

Canvas — a coarse cloth : it also means the sails of ships or 
boats, which are made of this cloth. 



LESSON XXXI. 



UNCLE JOHN— NO. III. 



Mary and Henry asked their Uncle John a 
good deal about death ; and where their mother 
went when she died. He told them she had tried 
to follow Jesus Christ, and that her friends all 
hoped and believed she was with him in heaven. 

" You know that on the very day she died," 
said Uncle John, "she called you all to her bed, 
and told you to follow Jesus Christ, and to meet 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 61 

her when you died, in that good world where 
Jesus is. We hope and believe she is happy 
there ; but while you love and remember your 
dear mother, remember also that she told you 
to follow Jesus : only he can save us and take us 
to the good place. It is not right to pray to 
anybody, even if we believe thern to be in heav- 
en : we must pray to God, who loves us more 
than the best mother loves her child. And now, 
Mary, can you tell me where I left off in our last 
talk about the Garden of Eden V 

" It was where Adam and Eve were sent out 
of it, and no one was ever allowed to enter it 
any more : and now, Uncle John, I'll tell you 
what /said about this when Henry and I went 
out to play. I asked him if God never came 
back to Adam any more ; and if we, and nobody 
else, can ever see him again ?" 

" God often spoke to the descendants or chil- 
dren of Adam and Eve ; he raised up good men 
called prophets, and to these he talked and told 
them to speak his words to the others, and to 
show them how they could get to Eden when 
they died. There was no more Eden in this 
world : when Adam and Eve sinned, the whole 
world was changed. Then briers and thorns be- 
gan to grow up in it— the wild animals became 
fierce and terrible, seeking to kill each other and 



62 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

everybody that came in their way — -men began 

to fight,, and Cain, Adam's first son, killed his own 
brother Abel — storms, and tempests, and sick- 
ness, and suffering, and death came into the world, 
and will continue in it till the world itself is 
iestroyed and burned up, as it will be some 
day. 

" Death itself is a dreadful thing ; and it comes 
to all people, and to all brutes, and animals, and 
trees, and flowers, and plants. What a dreadful 
thing sin is ! But God was good to Adam and 
his children — he told him how he might find the 
favor of God in this world, live in peace, and die 
in hope of going again to Eden, to the place of 
happiness forever. 

" He told him, and he told the prophets to 
tell all people, that he would send his own Son, 
the Son of God himself, to die for sin ; and that 
whoever should be sorry for his sin, and ask God 
to save him for the sake of this Son, should be 
made happy forever. 

" In this way we hope your dear mother was 
saved and is now happy ; and how thankful you 
ought to be to God for it !" 

" Did the Son of God die for mother's sins ?" 
inquired Henry. 4C What did lie do that he had 
to die V' 

" He did no wrong at all " replied Uncle John* 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 63 

" he was pure, and without sin, and died of his 
free will. He was not obliged to die; but he 
and the Father loved man, and pitied him, al- 
though man had sinned, and so God the Father 
sent down his Son Jesus Christ from the shining 
courts of heaven, to be born of a woman, to 
grow up like a man, and suffer every kind of 
pain and hardship, to be mocked, and spit on, 
and despised, to be nailed to a tree, and be put 
to a most cruel, cruel death. 

" He was not obliged to do this ; but because 
Adam, the father of all people, had sinned, all 
people would have to be shut out forever from 
God, and to suffer dreadful punishment. To 
prevent this, Jesus Christ, God's own Son, came 
down to this poor world ; and he was born a 
little child, and grew up among very poor people, 
going about doing good to everybody. 

" He did not live with the rich and great, 
though all the world and every thing in it was 
his ; but he was the friend of the poor and un- 
fortunate, he hunted out the most wretched peo- 
ple, and taught every one how to please God 
and be happy. When he was abused he did not 
return it ; but he was full of patience, and kind- 
ness, and love, even taking up poor little chil- 
dren in his arms and blessing them. At last 
wicked people took him, and bound him, and 



64 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

nailed him to a tree : and after spitting on him^ 
and abusing him in all manner of ways, they put 
him to death. 

"But he arose from the dead on the third 
day ; and after being seen by a great many peo- 
ple, he went back to heaven. And now he is 
the friend of every one that tries to serve God; 
and for his sake God will take all such to heaven 
when they die ; that is, they will go where Jesus 
is, to a place more beautiful even and happy 
than that Eden was to which Henry wished to 
go. 

" But I want you to remember always every 
thing I tell you about Jesus Christ ; it is all per- 
fectly true, and it is our duty to know it and 
remember it. Therefore I will say no more to 
you now : little folks ought to go to bed early, 
and get up early, and it is time now for you to 
go to sleep. Before you close your eyes, ask 
God to keep you through the night — and to spare 
you, and to take care of you, and take you at 
last to heaven for the sake of Jesus Christ," 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



65 



LESSON XXXII. 



poor 

man 

six 

years 

sent 

loaf 

broke 

shall 

been 



hon-est 

e-ven-ing 

lit-tle 

ba-ker 

re-turned 

fa-ther 

wa-ges 

hun-gry 

re-plied 



pleased 

re- quire 

mor-sel 

com-fort 

nour-ish 

un-ex-pect-ed 

dis-kon-est 

star-va-tion 

glit-ter-ing 



THE HONEST POOR MAN. 



One evening a poor man sat by the wayside 
waiting tke return of kis son, a little boy of six 
years, whom ke kad sent to tke baker to buy a 
loaf of bread. Tke boy soon returned with the 
loaf, which the father took and broke and gave 
kalf to kis boy. 

" Not so, father," said tke boy. " I skall not 
eat until after you. You kave been at work hard 
all day for small wages, to support me, and you 
must be very hungry : I shall wait till you are 
done." 

" You speak kindly, my son," replied the pleased 
father ; " your love to me does me more good 



66 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

than my food ; and those eyes of yours remind 
me of your dear mother who has left us, who 
told you to love me as she used to do ; and in- 
deed, my boy, you have been a great strength 
and comfort to me ; but now that I have ate the 
first morsel to please you, it is your turn now to 
eat." 

" Thank you, father ; but break this piece in 
two, and take a little more, for you see the loaf 
is not large, and you require much more than 
I do." 

" I will divide the loaf for you, my boy ; but 
eat it, I will not ; I have abundance ; and let us 
thank God for his great goodness in giving us 
food, and in giving us what is better still, cheer- 
ful and contented hearts. He who gave us the 
living bread from heaven, to nourish our immor- 
tal souls, how shall he not give us all other 
food which is necessary to support our mortal 
bodies ?" 

The father and son thanked God, and then 
began to cut the loaf in pieces, to begin their 
frugal meal. 

But as they cut one portion of the loaf, several 
large pieces of gold, of great value, fell out. 

The little boy gave a shout of joy, and was 
springing to grasp the unexpected treasure, when 
he was pulled back by his father. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER MO. I. 67 

44 My son, my son !" lie cried, " do not touch 
that money ; it is not ours !" 

" But whose is it, if it is not ours ?" 

44 I know not, as yet, to whom it belongs ; but 
probably it was put there by the baker, through 
some mistake. We must inquire." 

44 But, father," interrupted the boy, " you are 
poor and needy, and we have bought the loaf, and 
the baker may tell a lie, and—" 

44 1 will not listen to you, my boy ; we bought 
the loaf, but we did not buy the gold in it. If 
the baker sold it to us in ignorance, I shall not 
be so dishonest as to take advantage of him : re- 
member Him who told us to do to others as we 
would have others do to us. The baker may 
possibly cheat us. I am poor, indeed, but that 
is no sin. 

44 If w^e share the poverty of Jesus, God's own 
Son, oh ! let us share, also, his goodness and his 
trust in God. We may never be rich, but we 
may always be honest. We may die of star- 
vation, but God's will be done, should we 
die in doing it ! Yes, my boy, trust God, and 
walk in his ways, and you shall never he put to 
shame. 

44 Now run to the baker, and bring him 
here ; and I will watch the gold until he 
comes." 



68 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

So the boy ran for the baker. 

" Baker," said the old man, " you have made 
some mistake, and almost lost your money ;" and 
he showed him the gold, and told him how it 
had been found. 

"Is it thine?" asked the father; " if it is, take 
it away." 

" My father, baker, is very poor, and — " 

" Silence, my child ; put me not to shame by 
thy complaints. I am glad we have saved this 
man from losing his money." 

The baker had been gazing alternately upon 
the honest father and his eager boy, and upon 
the gold which lay glittering upon the green 
turf. 

" Thou art, indeed, an honest fellow," said the 
baker. " Now, I will tell thee about the gold : 
a stranger came to my shop some days ago, and 
gave me that loaf, and told me to sell it cheap, or to 
give it away to the most honest poor man I knew 
in town ; so I sold it to the boy, to take to thee. 
The loaf, with all its treasure — and it is not 
small ! — is thine, and God grant thee a blessing 
with it !" 

The poor father bent his head to the ground, 
while the tears fell from his eyes. 

His boy ran and put his arms around his neck, 
and said, " I shall always, like you, my father, 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 69 

trust Gocl and do what is right ; for I am sure it 
will never put us to shame," 



Morsel — means a piece, a bite, or little part. 

Alternately — looking alternately, means to look on one and 
then on another. 

Abundance — means plenty. 

Unexpected — not looked for. 

Frugal — moderate, not large. 

Glitter— -to shine. 

Meal — the flour of corn ; also it means a dinner, supper, op 
breakfast. 



LESSON XXXIII. 



hear 


thank 


be-low 


heav-en 


fear 


thou 


fee-ble 


do-ing 


like 


wrong 


pray-er 


need'st 


mine 


child 


lit-tle 


said'st 


thine 


praise 


list-ens 


should 



GOD IS IN HEAVEN. 

God is in heaven : and can he hear 

A feeble prayer like mine ? 
Yes, little child, thou need'st not fear. 
He listens now to thine. 

God is in heaven : and can he see 
When I am doing wrong ? 

4 



70 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

Yes, child, lie can — he looks at thee 
All day, and all night long. 

God is in heaven : and would he know 

If I should tell a lie ? 
Yes, if thou said'st it e'er so low, 

He'd hear it in the sky. 

God is in heaven : and can I go 
To thank him for his care ? 

Not yet— but love him here below, 
And thou shalt praise him there. 



Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all 
thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all 
thy might. 



LESSON XXXIV. 



best 


read 


word 


Bi-ble 


books 


save 


safe 


old-er 


make 


from 


your 


ho-ly 


wise 


feel 


soul 


Je-sus 


when 


fear 


a-way 


heav-en 


The Bible 


is the best of all books. 


God gave 



it to man to make him wise and good. When 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. 1. 



71 



you are older, you will be able to read the holy 
book of God. It will tell you how God sent his 
dear Son to save men from sin. If you read the 
word of God, and feel his love, and try to do his 
will, when you die you will go and live with 
Jesus in heaven. 

Put away sin and fear God, and your soul will 
be safe in his hand. 

" May I live to know and fear him, 
Trust and love him, all my days ; 

Then go and dwell forever near him, 
See his face, and sing his praised 



Try the way of God : the end is joy. 



LESSON XXXY. 



Rose 


a-lone 


dress-ing-room 


vain 


do-ing 


beau-ty 


was 


les-son 


guess 


some 


sup-pose 


look-ing-glass 


nice 


read-ing 


peo-ple 


thing 


sto-ry 


walked 


this 


Bi-ble 


ad-mired 


oh 


use-ful 


pret-ti-er 



72 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



then 


help-ing 


be-hold-eth 


work 


fin-ish 


Al-migh-ty 


dear 


some-thin^ 


for-got-ten 


cap 


mam-ma 


Sam-u-el 


frock 


mak-ing 


coun-te-nance 


poor 


a-sharned 


beg-gar-child 


what 


stand-ing 


pit-ied 


house 


her-self 


ad-mir-ing 



THE VAIN BEAUTY. 



Rose was alone in her mamma's dressing-room. 
u What was she doing? Learning her lesson, I 
suppose, or reading some sweet story in the Bible, 
or some nice useful thing or other." 

u No; she was not doing this.'' 

" Oh, then, perhaps she was at work, helping 
to finish something for her dear mamma, or mak- 
ing a cap or frock for a poor child." 

" No, no ; it was none of these — you cannot 
guess it ; and I must tell you, I am ashamed to 
say that little Rose was standing admiring her 
self in the looking-glass." 

" Oh, dear, how vain little Rose must have 
been !" 

a Yes; I am afraid she was so: she had heard 
some people remark, Miss Rose is quite a beauty. 
One praised her eyes, another her mouth ; one 
took notice of her nice hair, and another of her 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 73 

red cheeks ; and Rose was rnuch pleased : and 
as she walked about the house, she said to her- 
self, ' I am a beauty — everybody admires me ;' 
and so she very much admired herself." 

" Now, was not Rose very silly ? She had seen 
wax dolls, a great deal prettier than herself, and 
she heard them called beauties, too ; and every 
thing that had been said about her eyes, and her 
mouth, and her hair, and her cheeks, might be said 
of a doll. And Rose had had pretty toys, which 
she had thought much of at first; but after a 
little while she had broken them or thrown 
them away, or forgotten them. 

"The silly people, who talked of Rose's beauty, 
cared not a bit more for her in their hearts, than 
she did for her old toys. They thought her a little 
fool, or they would not have talked so to her; and 
if they had peeped in at the door, and seen Miss 
Rose before the glass, how they would have 
laughed !~should not you V 

" Why, no ; I don't think I should have 
laughed ; I should have been very much grieved." 

" Ah, yes ; you are right. There was One 
looking at Rose, whom she did not think about— 
the Almighty God, who always sees what we 
do, and hears what we say, and knows what we 
think. Rose was proud ; and God hates pride. 
The Bible says, 4 The proud he beholdeth afar 

4 



74 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

off;' that is, he will not let them come near him. 
How dreadful ! for if God does not keep us near 
him, we are left in the power of the devil, to 
deceive and destroy us. 

" It is also said in the Bible, when the prophet 
Samuel made Jesse's sons to pass before him, he 
saw one of them very beautiful, and he thought 
perhaps the Lord had chosen him. But the Lord 
said unto Samuel, 'Look not on his countenance, 
nor the height of his stature, because I have re- 
fused him : for the Lord seeth not as man seeth ; 
for man looketh on the outward appearance, but 
the Lord looketh on the heart.' So, when Rose 
was gazing at herself in the glass, and thinking 
of her beauty, the Lord was looking at her heart, 
and beholding her afar off: the poor Rose was 
more to be pitied than any humble beggar-child 
whom the Lord loves." 



Vain — means proud of one's self: foolish and proud. 

The good people, and the great people are not vain. 

A vain boy or girl is very foolish ; while they are thinking 
so much of themselves, other folks are laughing at them, and 
God is displeased with them. 

Admiring — to admire one's self is to love and be proud of 
one's self. 

Girls ought to be neat, and keep themselves clean ; but they 
should be more anxious to do well, to be kind, and good, and 
gentle, than to look pretty. 

Gazing— to gaze is to look, 



NORTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 75 



LESSON XXXVI. 



UNCLE JOHN NO. IV. 



Uncle John again told Henry and Mary that 
while they loved their mother, they ought to 
love still more that God who was so good to 
her, and to love Jesus Christ, the Son of God, 
who died to save all who come to him. How 
wonderfully good he is ! and how we ought to 
think of him every day, and to love him and 
pray to him ! 

" Well, Henry," said Uncle John, " do you now 
know why you cannot get to Eden, that beauti- 
ful, happy place where Adam was ?" 

"Yes, sir: it is because we have all sinned 
against God, that we cannot get to the happy 
place where he is till we die." 

" But where do the bad people go when they 
die, Uncle John V asked Mary. 

44 They go to a dreadful place where they will 
have to live forever with the devil, in pain, and 
horrible suffering. The devil is not yet shut up 
there— he is in the world — but you must not be- 
lieve those foolish stories about his coming to 
people in great ugly shapes. The devil never 
shows himself to us — he is too cunning for that — ■ 



76 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

for he knows if he did, we would run from hini. 
No, lie never shows himself to any one ; but he 
whispers to us to do evil, and puts bad thoughts 
in our hearts, and causes us to be angry, and 
quarrel, and fight, and disobey our parents, and 
do harm to each other. When God told Adam 
and Eve not to eat the forbidden fruit, Satan 
ina^e them believe it was no harm to disobey 
God; and so he begins to talk to the very 
youngest children, and when they are told to do 
good, Satan whispers in their hearts not to 
mind it. 

"He says to them, as he said to Eve, it is 
no harm to do this little thing, it is so little ; and 
if we obey Satan in this, he will get more and 
more power over us, and when we are grown up, 
will make us wicked men and women, and pre- 
pare us for the dreadful place where the devil 
is to live forever. When he tempts us — and 
whenever we want to do what we have been told 
by the Bible and our parents is wrong, he is tempt- 
ing us — when he tempts us we ought to ask God, 
for Jesus Christ's sake, to help us to be good. 

" Jesus Christ knows all our sufferings, and 
trials, and temptations ; he passed through all 
the troubles and vexations which we have to 
endure, and he did it without sin and without 
complaining. He pleased God by his perfect 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 77 

obedience ; and God lias put him at his right 
hand, and given him all power in heaven and 
earth. But though he is now so great, he 
knows how to feel for us ; and he has said that 
he will help every one that calls on him, all 
over the world. He sees all our thoughts ; and if 
we try to be like him,- he calls us his brothers 
and sisters." 

" Will he ever come back to the world, Uncle 
John V asked Henry. 

u Yes, he is with us now, when we call on 
him, though we do not see him. He lives with 
all good children, and all good men and wo- 
men ; and oh, how good and pure they ought to 
be to live with Jesus Christ ! He helps us in all 
our trials ; he made us ; he directs every thing ; 
and not a little sparrow falls to the ground with- 
out his permission. He knows the number of 
the very hairs on our heads ; and if we try to 
serve him, and be like him, and pray constantly 
to him, he will help us in every trouble, he will 
watch over us with a great deal more love and 
care than even our dear parents, and when we 
die he will come to us and take us home where 
we shall be happy forever and ever. He comes 
for all good people when they die ; and then, 
when he takes them, their eyes are opened, and 
they see him, and love him, and he makes them 



78 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

exceedingly happy ! Oh, how good God has 
been ! He is a God of love ; he made us to be 
happy, and in his book he tells us over and over 
again that he wants us to be happy. 

" How wonderfully good he was to send Jesus 
Christ to die for us ; and how ought we to love 
Jesus, and to pray to God to help us to be like 
him and to love him ! All the trouble in this 
world was brought in it by sin ; and though so 
many have disobeyed God, he still waits and calls 
on people to come to him and be his children. 
And, however much we have sinned, if we will 
go to him and confess it, and be sorry for it, and 
ask him to forgive us for the sake of Jesus Christ, 
he will do it ; for Jesus Christ died for sin, and 
God will forgive sin for his sake. We must al- 
ways ask in the name of Jesus Christ — for it is 
for his sake that God forgives us. But Jesus will 
not always plead for those who sin against God; 
when we die we can never repent any more. 
There will be no more hope for us then, if we do 
not do good while we live. 

" You ought, therefore, to pray every day to 
God to make you better, to keep you from sin, 
and to make you his children. And now I will 
give you a little prayer which you must both 
learn by heart by the next time we meet ; and 
you must repeat it every day, on your knees, in 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 79 

some secret place, and say it in earnest, and re- 
member that God is looking at you, and hears 
you just as certain as I now see you. Say your 
prayer as if you saw Mm standing before you, 
for he is by you all the time, and it is a dreadful 
tiling to mock him." 

u Heavenly Father, forgive me for all my sins : 
help me to do good, and to obey and love thee : 
teach me all my duty, take care of me while I 
live, and keep me from evil, and sav<3 me in heav- 
en when I die, for the sake of Jesus Christ, who 
died for sin. Amen." 



LESSON XXXVII. 

MAKER OF HEAVEN AND EARTH. 

All things bright and beautiful, 
All creatures great and small, 

All things wise and wonderful, 
The Lord God made them all. 

Each little flower that opens, 
Each little bird that sings, 

He made their glowing colors, 
He made their tiny wings. 



80 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

The rich man in his castle, 
The poor man at his gate, 

Gob made them, high or lowly § 
And order'd their estate. 

The purple-headed mountain, 
The river running by, 

The sunset, and the morning 
That brightens up the sky ; 

The cold wind in the winter, 
The pleasant summer sun, 

The ripe fruits in the garden , 
He made them every one. 

The tall trees in the greenwood, 
The meadows where we play, 

The rushes by the water, 
We gather every day ; 

He gave us eyes to see them, 
And lips that we might tell 

How great is God Almighty, 
Who hath made all things well 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 81 



LESSON XXXVIII. 



them 


sup-pose 


sev-er-al 


a-mong 


car-pen-ters 


clear-ly 


world 


thou-sands 


mi-cro-scope 


earth 


dif-fer-ent 


fur-nished 


that 


in-sects 


won-der-ful 


tools 


sin-gu-lar 


ex-cel-lent 


bought 


saw-fly 


grass-hop-pers 



THE CARPENTER BEE. 



You must not suppose that men are the only 
carpenters in the world ; there are thousands of 
them among the different insects of the earth. 
If you ask me where they get their tools from, 
I reply, they get them where we get every thing 
that is good, even from God himself. 

Many may smile at the thought of insects hav- 
ing tools to work with, and may think that they 
must be singular tools ; but let me tell you that 
they are much better than man ever made, and 
better adapted to work with than those which 
are bought at the store. 

There is no saw found, made by men's hands, 
equal to that of the saw-fly. This little insect 
saws holes in the stems of the bushes in which it 

4* 



82 NOKTH-CABOLINA HEADER NO. I. 

lives, to put his eggs in, and this he does better 
than a carpenter could do it for him. His saws, 
for he has two of them, have very fine teeth. 
They are kept in a hard horny case, but are too 
small to be clearly seen without the aid of a glass 
called a microscope. 

There are, too, several grasshoppers which 
have most excellent gimlets, as well as the car- 
penter bee ; and all these insects can bore a hole 
in wood as round as your father can, Samuel. 

The carpenter bee is a capital worker, and 
works more than a foot deep in hard oak, to 
place his eggs in. God is " wise in counsel, and 
wonderful in working," and he has furnished these 
little carpenters with all the tools they require ; 
nay, he gave these tools to them before man 
knew how to make them or use them ; therefore 
we should be humble, remembering that God 
careth for insects, and provides for them, as well 
as for us. 

If, in his wisdom and mercy, he has given us 
a mind better than theirs, this is only a greater 
reason why we should devote it all to his glory. 



Microscope — a glass which makes things seem larger wheii 
you look at them through it. 

Carpenter — one who works in wood and builds houses. 
Insects — small animals, such as a bee or fly. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I 



83 



LESSON XXXIX. 



young 


cru-el 


starved 


large 


wick-ed 


pass-ing 


fell 


tempt-ed 


get-ting 


hand 


in-sect 


rained 


gave 


in-jure 


fi-nal-ly 


ground 


moth-er 


wan-ton 


down 


be-cause 


read-er 


dead 


hun-gry 


harm-less 


through 


chirp-ing 


re-mem-ber 




THE CRUEL 


BOY. 



As a bird was one day flying to seek food for 
its young ones, a large boy saw it : he had a gun 
in his hand, and shot the poor thing through its 
head, and down it fell to the ground. The boy 
then ran to it, and when he saw that it was dead, 
he gave it to his dog to eat. 

How cruel and wicked it was to kill the poor 
bird, which never did any harm in all its life ; 
and to take it from its young ones that were in 
the nest, waiting for it to come back and feed 
them ! 

The poor little birds could not think why their 



84 NORTH- CAROLINA READER XO. I. 

clear mother stayed so long from them, and kept 
chirping and chirping until they were quite 
tired. 

At night they grew so cold, for want of their 
mother to brood over them, that they did not 
know what to do. There were five in the nest, 
and two of them died with cold and hunger that 
night. 

The other three lived till the next morning, 
when, getting to the edge of the nest to look for 
their mother, two of them fell and broke their 
bones. They lay in great pain for some time 
upon the ground, but could not move, for they 
were too young to hop or fly. 

At last a great hog that was passing by saw 
them on the ground and ate them up, and so put 
them out of their pain. 

But the other poor little thing that was left 
in the nest did not die so soon, for it lived all 
day very cold, and in great pain, from being so 
hungry for want of food. 

It kept chirping as long as it had strength to 
make any noise, in hopes its mother would hear, 
and come and feed it. 

Poor thing, she had been shot by the cruel 
boy, and was dead, and could not hear it. 

So, at last, when it was quite tired, it lay still 
at the bottom of the nest ; and in the night it 



NORTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



85 



rained fast, and the wind blew, and finally it died 
of cold, like tlie others. 

Thus there was an end to five pretty young 
birds, that all died in so dreadful a w T ay, because 
a wanton, cruel, and wicked boy shot their poor 
mother. 

We hope our young readers will remember 
this story, whenever they are tempted to kill or 
injure the harmless birds or insects that God has 
made. 



To brood — means to sit, as a hen sits on her young ones, 
covering them with her wings to keep them warm. 



A£E&fc 




86 



NORTH- CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



LESSON XL. 



THE IDLE CHILDKEN. 



There were once three children, who, instead 

>f going to school, as they should have done 

rtayed away, grumbling that learning was sue! 

a stupid thing. 

" Let us go to the woods," they all three criec 
at once : " Let us go to the woods, and plaj 
with the little animals there : they never go t( 
school !" 




When they came to the woods, they asked) 
the animals, both great and small, to play with! 
them. 



JSrOKTH-CAKOLINA EEADER NO. I. 87 

• c We are very sorry, but really we've just now 
3 time," replied the animals. 

The beetle hummed : 

"That would be fine, if we were to idle with 
3u, children ; I must build a fresh bridge of 
^ass ; the old one is not safe." 

The children crept softly past the ant-hill ; 
id as for the bee, they ran away from her just 
| though she had been a wild beast. 

The little mouse cried in a shrill little voice, 
I'm gathering up corn and seeds for the winter." 

" And I," said the little white dove, " am car- 
ring dry sticks for my nest." 

The rabbit only nodded to them. " I can't 
>me and play with you for the whole world," 
lid he .; " I've got such a dirty face, and must 
o and wash it." 

The little strawberry-blossom said, "I must 
take use of this fine day, and ripen my fruit, 
lat it may be ready when the good children 
Dme to look for it." 

Then came a young cock, strutting through the 
ood. 

" Dear Mr. Chicken, you surely have nothing 
do ; you can come and play a while with 
i?" 

" Pardon," cried he, with great gravity ; " I've 
oble guests at my house to-day, and have to set 



88 NOETH-CAEOLINA EEADER NO. I. 

out a feast for them;" and bowing very stiffl; 
away lie went. 

Then the children spoke to the little streai 
that was running along so merrily. 

" Do, dear little stream, come and play wit 
us ?" 

But the stream asked, quite astonished, " Wh£ 
do you mean, children ? Yes, indeed ! I don 
know what to do, I am so very busy, and yet yo 
ask me to play with you ! I can't stop eithe 
night or day. Men, beasts, gardens, wood 
meadows, valleys, mountains, and fields, I mui 
give them all water to drink, and wash all th 
dishes and clothes besides ! 

" I must turn the mill, saw planks, spin woo 
carry along boats upon my back, put out fir 
and much besides. I stop and play with id] 
children, indeed !" And away the stream fiowe 
as fast as ever it could. 

The children were getting out of heart, an 
thought they must give up all hope of findin 
playfellows in the woods, when they saw a fine 
sitting upon a branch, singing and eating b 
turns. They called out to him their invitation. 

" Stars and garters," exclaimed the finch, grea 
ly surprised ; " can I believe my ears ? Yo 
children seem to be under a great mistak 
I've not time to play, not I ! Here I've bee 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 89 

basing flies all day, and now my young ones 
ant me to sing them to sleep. I'm singing to 
lem the praise of labor. How can you think 
) badly of me ? No, you turn back again, lazy 
Itiildren, and don't disturb the industrious folks 
i the wood." 

Thus taught by the animals, the children 
irned back to school very willingly, finding 
i at play is alone the reward of industry and 
ork. 



LESSON XII. 

REMEMBER THE SABBATH. 

.Remember the sabbath, 
It's God's holy day; 
Remember, the sabbath 
Is hallowed by prayer ; 
Remember the sabbath, 
To God's house repair. 
Remember the sabbath, 
God's holy word learn ; 
Remember the sabbath, 
And bless its return. 



90 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. T 



LESSON XLII 



wliicli 


there 


sur-prise 


hangs 


boughs 


im-a-gine 


twigs 


does 


sew-ing 


would 


deal 


stitch-es 


that 


thread 


to-geth-er 


nest 


tai-lors 


work-man-lik 




THE TAILOR 


BIRD. 



There is a bird in America, which general! 
hangs its nest from the boughs or twigs of , 
fruit-tree, in a manner that w^ould surprise you 
but the way in which he makes his nest woul< 
surprise you a great deal more. 

He gets together a sufficient quantity of toug] 
long grass, and this grass he bends round, am 
sews through and through with his bill in even 
direction. 

So cleverly does he do this, that you migh 
almost imagine that it had been done with i 
large stocking-needle. 

The tailor bird is still more neat in his sew 
ing, for he stitches together large leaves to hid< 
his nest with, in a most workmanlike manner. 

The needle he uses is his fine long bill, and i 
capital needle it is, I assure you. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



91 



As for Ms thread, lie makes that with his feet 

md bill, from cotton, which he gathers from the 
ihrubs about him. 



~ O ^ Jy^ 




Yon see, then, that there are many more tai- 
ors in the world than yon imagined. 

How good is God, to teach these little crea- 
Inres to take care of themselves ! Truly may 
It be said of him, " His tender mercies are over 
fll his works." Psa. cxlv. 9. 



Bill — the bill of a bird is its mouth, 
Shrub — a small bush. 



92 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



LESSON XLIII. 



UNCLE JOHN NO. V. 



Now, my dear children, I have told you hov 
you can get to a better place than that beautii 
ful Garden of Eden, to which you wished to gc 
Heaven, where all good people go when the^ 
die, is a far happier place ; and there we will al 
see that blessed Jesus who died for us, to hel] 
us to get there. 

If you will really, in your hearts, wish to g 
there, as you wished to go to Eden, Christ wil 
take you there some day; but you must wai 
till he comes after you, and you must try to shoT 
others the way, and to do good to them, even a 
Christ did good to all. He commands us to d 
this ; to be kind to the good and bad, to the poo 
and needy, and to try and help them to d 
good. 

We must forgive others, or God will not foi 
give us ; and we must pray constantly to hin 
He made us — he made all things — he keeps ui 
alive, and we could not live a minute withou 
him. 

He sends food to the hungry, and makes hi 
sun to shine on the bad and good ; but he wil 



N0RTH-€AR0LINA READER NO. I. 93 

not save the bad if they do not repent and do 
better, and ask his forgiveness for Christ's sake. 

Everybody that is saved is saved for the sake 
of Jesus Christ ; and he commands us to go to 
those who have not heard of him, and to tell 
them all about his goodness, and what he has 
done for them. 

There are a great many unhappy people who 
have never heard of Jesus Christ ; and if we have 
heard of him, and do not tell others the good 
news about him, he will be angry with us. 

When you receive any thing good, you like 
to give some of it to yonr friends to make them 
happy also : so when you have heard about the 
goodness of our heavenly Father, you ought to 
tell it to others, and let them know what he 
has done for us. 

The best thing you can do to please God is 
to give your heart to him while you are young : 
and if you will ask him he will make you good 
boys and girls, will keep you from all evil, will 
take good care of you while you live, and love 
you and make you happy, and when you come 
to die, Jesus Christ will come after you and take 
you to that beautiful place where you will meet all 
the good people that ever lived, and where you 
will be happy forever. 

But you must pray every day ; and always 



94 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

remember that God sees you, and keeps you 
alive, and that nobody could live one moment 
without him. 

How wicked it is then not to love and obey 
Him who made us, and whose Son died for us ! 

In the next lesson I will tell you more about 
what you were made for, and what you ought 
to do. 



LESSON XLIY. 



UNCLE JOHN NO. VL 



" What did I tell you, Henry, in our last talk, 
was the first duty of everybody ?" 

u It was to love and obey God, and to pray to 
him to save us for the sake of his Son, Jesus 
Christ," answered Henry. 

u That is our first duty," said Uncle John; 
" and our next duty is to tell others about God 
and Jesus Christ." 

" And will God be angry with us, in we don % t ?" 
asked Mary. 

" Certainly he will," replied Uncle John ; "and 
he will never allow us to be happy if we do not. 
We may get rich, and have fine houses, and 
travel over the world, and see a great deal ; but 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 95 

if we do not love and obey God, and try to teach 
others to do it, we will be miserable while we 
live, and will die and go to the bad place. God 
did not make ns just to work for money; he 
made us to obey him, to do good to others, 
and to live with him in a happy place forever. 

" When a rich man dies, he has to leave all his 
money and fine things behind him ; he cannot 
carry any of these away with him to the other 
world. When a good man dies he goes to the 
good place ; and there he does not need any thing 
but a good heart. When we die we only carry 
our hearts away with us: if we carry away a 
bad heart, God drives us away to the bad place ; 
but if we carry a good heart, he receives us and 
keeps us in the good place. Who can give you 
a good heart, Henry ?" 

" Jesus Christ will, if we pray to God for his 
sake." 

" Yes, you cannot make yourselves good. You 
must pray to God to give you a mind like that 
of Jesus Christ. But I told you that you must 
try to make others learn about Jesus Christ. 
God has written a Book called the Bible : it is 
all his Book, and in that he tells us what we have 
to do, and what, becomes of us when we die. It 
is a most wonderful Book: it tells us how the 
world and every thing was made, and if it was not 



96 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

for it we would be very unhappy, and not know 
what to do. 

44 God made this Book and gave it to us : he 
came down from heaven and gave us this Book 
to teach us how to be happy. It is, therefore, 
as you may well think, the greatest treasure on 
earth ; it is worth more than all the other Books 
put together, for it is the word of our heavenly 
Father. How delighted you will be to read it ! 
Good children never get tired reading it; and 
good men read it every day of their lives : it is 
the Book your mother read most of all. 

u All the wise men in the world could not make 
such a Book ; and as it is God's word, we will get 
wiser and wiser the more we read it. You ask 
me a great many questions about things, and no 
doubt you think I know a good deal, and wish 
you were as wise as I am : now this Book will 
tell you ten times more than I can, and the 
more you read it the more you will know. You 
must read it every day, all your lives ; and 
you must pray to God to help you to under- 
stand it. 

44 If you will do this from now till the time 
you are as old as I am, how wise and happy you 
will be ! Read it, my dear children, every clay, 
and ask God to explain it to you ; read it for 
yourselves, and keep reading and reading, and 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 97 

when you get to be men and women, how glad 
you will be that I told you to do this ! 

"Now all the people in the world have not 
seen this good Book yet; and the way to do 
good to them, is to send them this Book made 
by our heavenly Father. Oh, how miserable 
they are without it ! Oh, how happy they will 
be to get it ! How good God has been to us, to 
give us this blessed Book while so many others 
have not got it. But he told us to send it to 
them : this is a duty he commands us to do, to 
send his Book to everybody, and he will be 
angry if we do not. 

44 Our heavenly Father gave it to us to send 
it to all the people of the world : he commanded 
us to do this, and to read it ourselves every day, 
and remember w T hat it says, and to pray to him 
to help us to understand it. If we do not do 
this, God will punish us ; and God is greater 
than all the people on earth, for he made them 
all, and keeps them all alive." 



98 NOKTH-CAROLINA HEADElt NO. I, 



LESSON XLV. 

I 5 M NOT TOO YOUNG FOR GOD TO SEE. 

I'm not too young for God to see ; 

He knows my name and nature too ; 
And all day long lie looks at me, 

And sees my actions through and through* 

He listens to the words I say, 

And knows the thoughts I have within ; 
And whether I'm at work or play, 

He's sure to know it if I sin. 

Oh, how could children tell a lie, 

Or cheat in play, or steal, or fight, 
If they remembered God was nigh, 
And had them always in his sight ? 

If some good minister is near, 
It makes us careful what we do ; 

Then how much more we ought to fear 
The God who sees us through and through! 

Then when I want to do amiss 5 

However pleasant it may be, 
I'll always strive to think of this— 

" I'm not too young for God to see." 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 99 



LESSON XLVI. 



farm-er 


else-where 


lux-u-ries 


in-deed 


trimmed 


temp-ta-tions 


con-cern 


shep-herd 


cul-ti-va-ted 


Da-vid 


fo-li-age 


sur-round-ing 


Is-ra-el 


em-ployed 


shrub-ber-y 


al-though 


A»bra-ham 


in-dus-tri-ous 


weed-ed 


en-tire-ly 


Cin-cin-na-tus 




THE FARMER. 





The life of a farmer is indeed employed about 
the earth. But it is no mean concern. 

Washington was a farmer. And in olden 
times Abraham cultivated flocks and herds ; 
and David, who in after years sat upon the 
throne of Israel, was himself a shepherd. No 
man in society is so independent as the farmer. 
He lives more entirely within himself than any 
other class. 

He raises the necessaries, and not a few of the 
comforts and luxuries of life. 

Nor is any profession more dignified, or more 
removed from temptations to pride and vice. 

What a delightful spot in this world of briers 
and thorns is the home, with its surrounding 



100 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

acres, of an honest, industrious, thrifty farmer ! 
What an air of neatness and comfort all things 
wear ! Even the grass seems to look greener 
than elsewhere : the shrubbery, all weeded out, 
smiles forth in beauty of its flowers : the well- 
trimmed trees put forth their rich foliage : the 
cattle seem to feel their superiority : the lambs 
skip somewhat more gaily, and even chanticleer 
raises his clarion voice some notes higher. 




I love to dwell on such a scene ; and I would 
wish to inspire my little readers in the country 
with contentment with their allotment. They 
are among the most happy, honored, and blessed 
of this world. 

Let my little readers fix well this matter ia 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 101 

their minds ; should they ever become farmers, 
let them not forget that neatness and order are 
among the chief virtues of a good farmer. With- 
out them, he cannot prosper, nor will his house 
and home be long pleasant to him. Besides, 
these are important in point of moral influence. 

Persons who are neat and attentive to method 
are more likely to be good, than the slovenly 
and careless. Fix well then m your minds the 
old maxim, for it is worth a thousand times more 
than its weight in gold : u Have a place for every 
thing, and keep every thing in its place." 

Let order o'er your time preside, 
And method all your business guide. 
One thing at once be still begun, 
Contrived, resolved, pursued, and done ; 
Ne'er till to-morrow's light delay, 
What might as well be done to-day : 
Neat be your barns, your houses neat ; 
Your doors be clean, your court-yards sweet ; 
Neat be your barns : 'tis long confessed, 
The neatest farmers are the best. 



Chanticleer — a cock, so called from the clearness or loudness 
of his voice in crowing. 

Clarion voice — a voice loud and clear like a clarion or trumpet. 
Foliage—\ eaves. 



102 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 



LESSON XLVII 



e-vil 


once 


dis-pleased 


kill 


spir-it 


mocked 


city 


stones 


de-ri-ded 


cross 


names 


dis-ci-ples 


kept 


be-cause 


king-dom 



LITTLE CHILDREN BROUGHT TO JESUS. 

When our Lord Jesus Christ was on the earth, 
he was once displeased. 

It was not because they called him evil names ; 
it was not that they charged him with having 
an evil spirit ; it was not when they took up 
stones to kill him, and when they cast him out 
of the city ; nor was it when they mocked and 
scourged him, nor when they nailed him to the 
cross, and derided him in his pain. 

He bore all this with meekness, like a lamb. 

But when he saw that some of his disciples 
would have kept little children from coming to 
him, he was " much displeased." 1 

Why did the disciples wish to keep them 
back ? Why did they stand in the way, and 
forbid them from going to their Master ? 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 103 

Had they not often seen how kind and loving 
he was, even to the weakest and the poorest ? 

Surely they must before this have seen his 
tender regard to the young. 

But while the disciples would have kept the 
children away, Jesus looked upon their young 
faces : he told the mothers and friends to bring 
the children to him, and, as he looked upon them, 
he showed how much he loved them. 

He took them up and blessed them, saying, 
" Suffer the little children to come unto me, and 
forbid them not ; for of such is the kingdom of 

God. 55 

— — 

Prove all things : hold fast that which is good. 



LESSON XLYIII. 

THE PRETTY BEE. 

Pretty bee, pray tell me why 
Thus from flower to flower you fly, 
Culling sweets the live-long day, 
Never leaving off to play ? 
" Little child, I'll tell you why 
Thus from flower to flower I fly ; 



104 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

Let the cause thy thoughts engage, 
From thy youth to riper age. 

" Summer flowers will soon be o'er ; 
Winter comes, they bloom no more : 
Finest days will soon be past, 
Brightest suns will set at last. 
Little child, now learn of me, 
Let thy youth the seed-time be ; 
And when wintry age shall come 
Richly bear thy harvest home.' 5 



LESSON XLIX. 



once 


talk 


Je-sus 


go-ing 


great 


voice 


cit-y 


a-rise 


dead 


much 


bod-y 


be-gan 


earth 


heart 


pit-y 


moth-er 



young oft-en on-ly hap-py 

RAISING THE WIDOW'S SON. 

Once Jesus met a great many men coming out 
of a city, who brought with them the body oi 
a young man. They were going to put it in 
the earth. The mother of the young man came 
with them very sad, for he was her only son. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 105 

And Jesus, when lie saw her, had pity for her, 
and said, Weep not. 

Then came he to the dead body and said, 
Young man, arise ! And he that had been dead, 
sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him 
to his mother, and he went home with her. 

Was there not great joy in the heart of that 
mother? Did she not talk much, and often, 
with her son, about him who had done so much 
for them ? 

When Jesus, at the last day, shall say to the 
dead, arise ! may we also hear his voice with joy. 
Oh, how happy will they be who meet him in 
the clouds, and go with him to heaven ! 



The Sabbath is the day of rest. 
It is called the Lord's Day, because on that 
day Jesus Christ rose from the dead. 



LESSON L. 

EASY QUESTIONS FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.^ 

Question. Who was the first man ? 

Answer. Adam. 

Q. Who was the first woman ? 

A. Eve. 

5* 



106 NOETH-CAROLINA HEADER NO. I. 

Q. Who was the first murderer ? 

A. Cain. 

Q. Who was the first martyr ? 

A. Abel 

Q. Who was the oldest man ? 

A. Methuselah. 

Q. Who built the ark? 

A. Noah. 

Q. Who was the most faithful man ? 

A, Abraham. 

Q. Who was the meekest man ? 

A. Moses. 

Q. Who was the most patient man ? 

.4. Job. 

Q. Who wrestled with the angel of God I 

A. Jacob. 

Q. Who led Israel into Canaan ? 

A. Joshua. 

Q. Who was the strongest man ? 

A. Sampson. 

Q. Who killed Goliath? 

A. David. 

Q. Who was the wisest man ? 

A. Solomon. 

Q. Who was cast into the lion's den ? 

A. Daniel. 

Q. Who died to redeem mankind ? 

A. Jesus Christ. 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 107 

Q. Who is Jesus Christ ? 

A. The Son of God. 

Q. Who was the mother of Christ ? 

A. Mary. 

Q. Who was the beloved disciple ? 

A. John. 

Q. Who betrayed his Lord and Saviour ? 

-4. Judas. 

Q. Who denied his Master, Christ ? 

A Peter. 

$. Who were struck dead for lying ? 

A. Ananias and Sapphira. 

Q. Who was the first Christian martyr ? 

A. Stephen. 

Q. Who was the chief apostle of the Gentiles? 

A Paul. 



LESSON LI. 

uncle john 5 s last lecture* 

And now, my little children, you are nearly 
through this book: having got thus far, you 
think you are learning pretty fast, do you not ? 
Now let me tell you one secret • folks who get 



1U8 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

through their books fastest, do not always learn 
the most. 

You must not think because you have read 
two or three little books, that you are learning 
a great deal : the great thing is to try to under- 
stand all that is in the book, and not merely to try 
to get through it. Foolish children hurry through 
their books, and then brag about them ; and yet 
they do not remember one half that is in them. 

A little boy or girl may run over the garden, 
and come out and not be able to tell you any 
thing that is in it ; and they may then run over 
the fields, and after all not know how the flowers 
and the corn are planted, and how they grow, 
and how- they are worked. 

And another little boy or girl will go into the 
garden, and count all the flower-beds, and notice 
all the plants, and see how the seeds are planted, 
and how the walks are laid out, and they will 
come out and tell you more than those foolish 
children who ran over half the plantation and 
learned nothing. 

Remember, you read tolearn, not to get through 
your book; and if you do not yet understand 
all that is in this book, instead of wanting a new 
one, you ought to go back and read it over again. 
A good teacher will not let children run over 
their book without learning ; but foolish teachers 



NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 109 

don't care much whether you learn or not, so 
that they can say they have got you through the 
book. 

They deceive the parents of children in this 
way ; but when you get wiser, you will see that 
good teachers act very differently. You will 
learn to honor and be very kind to good teachers, 
for they are your friends, and are laboring for 
your good; but bad teachers, who don't care 
whether you learn or not, ought not to be em- 
ployed. 

Now try to remember all that is in this book ; 
and you ought to keep it, even when you go into 
other books, and to read it over and over again. 
Remember the lessons of Uncle John: honor 
your parents, and love and remember them ; do 
good to each other, and be kind, and honest, and 
tell the truth ; and obey your teachers, and show 
them respect. 

And as you love your kind father and mother, 
love God who made them and you ; ask him every 
day to help you to learn what is good, and to 
keep you from evil, and to give you a good 
heart, and make you more and more like Jesus 
Christ. He is the one we are to try to be like ; 
and when you come to die you will be exceedingly 
glad that you have followed him, for nothing else 
on earth will save you. 



110 NORTH-CAROLINA READER NO. I. 

Read his good Book I told you about : read it 
every day while you live, send it to all who have 
not got it, and never think of passing one day 
without praying from your hearts to that God 
who sees you everywhere, and knows all your 
thoughts. So will you become wise and happy 
in this world, and when you die will go to heav- 
en and be forever happy with the good people 
in the presence of God. May I meet all my 
little readers in that happy world, where Jesus 
Christ has gone to prepare a place more delight- 
ful than the Garden of Eden for those who fol- 
low him ! 



THE END, 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 





NATIONAL 

READERS AND SPELLERS. 




BY E. G. PAEEER AND J. MADISON WATSON. 



THE NATIONAL SCHOOL PEIMEK; Or s PEIMABY 

WORD-BUTLDEB^. 64 pages, 16mo. 
THE NATIONAL FIKST BEADEB; Or, WORD-BUILDEB. 

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THE NATIONAL SECOND BEADEB. 224 pages, 16mo. 
THE NATIONAL THIBD BEADEB. 288 pages, 12mo. 
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NATIONAL ELEMENT ARY SPELLEB. 160 pages, 16mo. 
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The superiority of these Works, — in the simplicity, thoroughness, practi- 
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A. S. BASHES & CO., Publishers, 

NEW YORK